Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID): The death of an infant, less than 1 year of age that occurs suddenly and unexpectedly. After a case investigation, these deaths may be diagnosed as suffocation, asphyxia, entrapment, infection, ingestions, metabolic diseases, cardiac arrhythmias, trauma (accidental or non-accidental), or SIDS. In some cases where the evidence is not clear, or not enough information is available, the death is considered to be from an undetermined cause.
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS): The sudden death of an infant less than 1 year of age that cannot be explained after a thorough investigation is conducted, including a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and a review of the clinical history. SIDS is a type of SUID.
REDUCING THE RISK
Health care providers and researchers don’t know the exact causes of SIDS, but they do know certain things you can do to help reduce the risk of SIDS other sleep-related SUID, such as—
• Always place a baby on his or her back to sleep, for naps and at night, to reduce the risk of SIDS.
• Use a firm sleep surface, covered by a fitted sheet, to reduce the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death. See crib safety information from the Consumer Product Safety Commission for more information.
• Your baby should not sleep in an adult bed, on a couch, or on a chair alone, with you, or with anyone else.
• Keep soft objects, toys, and loose bedding out of your baby’s sleep area.
• To reduce the risk of SIDS, do not smoke during pregnancy, and do not smoke or allow smoking around your baby.
• Breastfeed your baby to reduce the risk of SIDS.
• Give your baby a dry pacifier that is not attached to a string for naps and at night to reduce the risk of SIDS.
• Do not let your baby get too hot during sleep.
For more detailed information on reducing the risk of SIDS, visit the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Web site .
CREATING A SAFE SLEEP ENVIRONMENT
Learn more about safe sleep environment and reducing the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths, by reading the NICHD publication What Does a Safe Sleep Environment Look Like? and visit their Safe to Sleep Public Education Campaign Web site.

 

*http://www.cdc.gov/features/SidsAwarenessMonth/