UV Safety Month is a great time to spread the message of sun, fun and UV safety to your community. The sun releases energy (radiation) in many forms. The sunlight we see is one form. The heat we feel from the sun is another. Ultraviolet (UV) rays, a third type, are also invisible to the eye. They can damage your eyes and hurt your vision.

You can protect your eyes from UV rays in two important ways: Know the dangers of UV rays, and wear proper eye protection and hats that block UV rays. UV rays can come from many directions. They radiate directly from the sun, but they are also reflected from the ground, from water, snow, sand and other bright surfaces. 

UV rays cause us to tan, and get a sunburn. Over-exposure to UV radiation is the main cause of skin cancer.

You can take these steps to help prevent skin cancer:

  • Stay out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Use sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher.
  • Cover up with long sleeves and a hat.
  • Check your skin regularly for changes.

http://www.thorek.org/uvsafetymonth/

 

We all need some sun exposure; it’s our primary source of vitamin D, which helps us absorb calcium for stronger, healthier bones. But it doesn’t take much time in the sun for most people to get the vitamin D they need, and repeated unprotected exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays can cause skin damage, eye damage, immune system suppression, and skin cancer. Even people in their twenties can develop skin cancer.

Sunburn Instruction Sheet

Most kids rack up a lot of their lifetime sun exposure before age 18, so it’s important that parents teach their children how to enjoy fun in the sun safely. With the right precautions, you can greatly reduce your child’s chance of developing skin cancer.

http://kidshealth.org/parent/index.jsp?tracking=P_Home